FutureZone 20:50

As well as running Green Directions, I am a member of the Sheffield City Region (UK) Low Carbon Sector Group.  Together with partners, I am developing a major infra-structure proposal; FutureZone 20:50.

FutureZone 20:50 is a proposal for an innovation park, close to the Advanced Manufacturing Park  www.attheamp.com/ , showcasing both a vision for living and working sustainably in the future and our region’s innovation and manufacturing excellence. It would include:

  • A vibrant interactive low carbon and innovation visitor attraction
  • a conference and exhibition centre
  • pavilions owned and run by companies highlighting their innovations and commitment to sustainability
  • a centre to showcase the outcomes of universities research and development programmes
  • a growth hub providing support for businesses to enter supply chains and capitalise on business opportunities ; for example, through the Catapult Centres
  • a low carbon retail zone
  • a low carbon transport hub including a cycle park

FutureZone 20:50 is about the future not the past. It is about inspiring and supporting sustainable growth for the economic and social benefit of people and communities.

My partners in the project are MMEK and Oliver Schutte. You might like to have a look at their websites to see examples of their inspiring work:

MMEK  –  a Dutch design company who have expertise in the creation of visitor attractions.         http://mmek.nl/

Oliver Schutte  – a Costa Rica based architect with experience in pan-European sustainability projects  http://www.a-01.net/

MMEK are currently working on an industrial/environmental museum in Zeeland  http://mmek.nl/en/#/mmek/work/industrial-museum-zeeland/ and have a lot of experience in the sport and leisure market e.g. the Dutch national football museum  http://www.voetbalexperience.nl/    They have also worked on visitor experiences for the Dutch flower industry and the Dutch water industry. You can see the full range of their work on the website.

 

Green Directions – the beginning

So what happens next when you have just bought a farmhouse, circa 1800, with attached barns two other collections of outbuildings and 10 acres of land? This was the wonderful opportunity and challenge facing me and my partner Sarah Brown in November 2003. We had both renovated properties before including another barn conversion, a terraced house and a detached house but this was on a completely different scale.

I started to research ways of tackling the project and was soon spending hours at exhibitions, reading magazines, watching programmes such as Grand Designs and searching on the internet. It didn’t take long for me to realise that we would have to take a radical approach to the renovation if the family were to live in such a large property sustainably.

Walking into the National Homebuilding and Renovating Show at the NEC in 2004 I was completely overwhelmed by a vast range of unfamiliar technologies such as heat pumps, under-floor heating, electricity generators, mechanical ventilation and insulation systems. Piles of leaflets returned to Sheffield, followed by more research and meetings with potential suppliers until an outline plan started to emerge.

A core part of the plan was to put in under-floor heating driven by ground source heat pumps which I installed with the help of a friend, Clive Quarmby. We spent many weeks digging trenches, laying pipes, soldering, fitting valves etc., using 8 different diameters of pipe in the process.

Sarah was pregnant with Arthur (now 6 – birthday in February), while all this was going on. By the time she returned from hospital with the new baby most of the heating was working and some of the floorboards in the bedroom had been restored. She was not happy.

Heat pumps need electricity to work and so we decided that we would have to make our own electricity to meet our objective of becoming energy neutral. I researched solar and wind power during 2004. Solar panels were about 3 times more expensive than they are now and were much more expensive than wind turbines compared with the amount of electricity they were likely to make. So, we bought a 6 kilowatt Proven wind turbine expecting it to make about 10,000 kilowatt hours per year. It didn’t. It made 14,000 kilowatt hours per year – fantastic.

The only trouble was we were using a lot more electricity than I had anticipated despite investing thousands of pounds on insulation and high-tec glazing. More investment was needed – more insulation and more energy generating technology.

We now have a 4 kilowatt solar power system which generates about 4000 kilowatt hours a year and have just installed a 10 kilowatt Xzeres wind turbine which hopefully will take us to our energy-neutral goal.

Every week I write down statistics from our systems. This is hopelessly inefficient and so I am now trying to find a data-logging system that will record everything automatically.